Bio


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Percussionist and educator Tatevik Khoja-Eynatyan is driven by her passion to use the arts as a tool for building peace.

Tatevik currently teaches with the El Sistema-inspired OrchKids program in Baltimore and teaches percussion and musicianship at the Baltimore School for the Arts and the International School of Music. She also spends a significant portion of each year in her native Armenia, where she is a faculty member of Sistema Armenia and pursues various other pedagogical activities. To date, she has used music as a source of much-needed focus and therapy at a crisis center for children and has facilitated various rhythm and movement workshops for hundreds of musicians and non-musicians of all ages throughout Armenia, Belgium, and the U.S.

In the past, Tatevik has taught percussion at the Levine School of Music in Washington, DC and the Peabody Preparatory’s Tuned In program. She has worked closely with Belgium’s educational organization ReMuA and the Ictus Contemporary Ensemble to create and present an educational concert program entitled “Sound and Body,” which focused on making music with non-traditional instruments and toured throughout Belgium and France. Tatevik was a founding member of Washington DC’s award-winning Narek Bell Choir, and performed with the group throughout the East Coast, and in Canada, Austria, France, the UK, and Armenia. In 2012 Tatevik was selected by the Armenian General Benevolent Union (AGBU) to perform in Carnegie Hall as one of the top recipients of AGBU’s musician scholarship program.

As a performer, Tatevik is interested in pushing boundaries and exploring gray areas – both musical and social. With her trio QuaQuaQua, she is working on developing new repertoire that explores the ambiguous terrain at the intersection of musical and theatrical performance, working closely with French composer François Sarhan. Most recently, she has had the privilege of participating in socially charged projects, such as the premiere of Judah Adashi’s Rise, a meditation on America’s ongoing civil rights journey; the Quest Visual Theater’s Look Through My Eyes, an exploration of color, gender, and disability; and Ruby Fulton’s video opera Adam’s Run, which challenges viewers to broaden their perspective on the definition of opera.

Tatevik has appeared with the SONAR New Music Ensemble in Baltimore’s Theater Project; Gent Advanced Master’s Ensemble (GAME) in the Concertgebouw, Bruges; the Palais de Beaux-Arts (BOZAR), Brussels; The Flemish Opera, Gent; and the Opera de Lille in Lille, France. She has participated in IRCAM’s summer festival Manifeste, in which she collaborated with composer Thierry de Mey, percussionists Steven Schick and Samuel Favre, and performed with choreographer Alban Richard. Tatevik was a founding member of the Washington DC-based “Narek Bell Choir,” and performed with the group throughout the East Coast, and in Canada, Austria, France, the UK, and Armenia. Tatevik was selected by the Armenian General Benevolent Union (AGBU) to perform in Carnegie Hall as one of the top recipients of AGBU’s musician scholarship program.

From the Peabody Institute, she earned a Bachelor’s degree and Graduate Performance Diploma in percussion under the instruction of Robert Van Sice, and a Master’s degree in Musicology. She recently completed the CONTACT Transformation Across Cultures Peacebuilding Program at the School for international Training, which included a Community Workshop Leadership Training with Musicians without Borders. She also has extensive experience in the non-profit sector through her work with international humanitarian and development organizations, including the Fund for Armenian Relief, Ayo!, and Focal/Change.

 

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